We are Family: The Columbus Ohio Group that gives: The Harmony Project


The Harmony Project led by David Brown gave everyone in Columbus, Ohio, a fun day of participating in a flash choir. It was all kinds of families: traditional, non-traditional, and just good friends. The definition of family is changing!

Come to our concert on July 18, and July 19th at the Southern Theater. You can buy tickets at OH CAPA,www.capa.com
We are 200 strong. This show will be fantastic, I guarantee it!

We raise money for projects in Columbus! Instead of talking about what we can’t do, we just do it! This group has been giving me joy since 2010. I can always count on attending either a rehearsal or an event, and coming home with a positive feeling.

Our amazing leader is David Brown. He is the conductor, and you can just see from this video how much positive energy he conveys.

*if you were there, look at the gallery, and then watch the video!

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Here’s someone even older than me! But not by much.

cancer killing recipe

Today is my birthday. I’m 65 years old. Happy birthday to me! And I’m celebrating 65 years of my immortality. Yeah! 65 years!

That’s: 780 months, 3380 weeks, 23660 days, 567840 hours, or many, many minutes.

Basicaly, if I think about this, i could have died any time, any day of my life, 23660 times in those 65 years, but I’m still alive and O.K.

This makes me very happy and proud of myself. And this is a reason for celebration.

I’m a survivor! I have survived 65 years of living and cancer.

I Google: How long does the average person lives? And I got the answer: About 80 – 100 years if nothing happens to them. Yeah. That’s very interesting. Because  as we all know, life is dangerous. …..Risk never sleeps….. From the minute we wake-up (if we wake-up), anything can happen to us.

I’m planning to live other…

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“Rock of Ages” the Movie was just okay


Rock of Ages (musical)

Rock of Ages (musical) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Before I left to see Rock of Ages, I checked out some quick reviews. It wasn’t really going over with the critics, but I went to see it anyway.

I enjoy the rock music of the 80’s and I enjoyed the songs, and the choreography.  The story was secondary, and it was pretty weak. The story took place in 1987. I also liked the costumes and the scenery.

The movie  features Juliana Hough, Alec Baldwin, Tom Cruise, Katherine Zeta Jones, Mary J Blige, Julianne Moore, and Diego Boneta

I knew what I was in for a few minutes after it started. Julianna Hough (Sherrie Christian) starts singing on the bus to Hollywood and the other people riding along joined in. It was hokey, but cute. The poor girl gets off the bus, someone says “welcome to Hollywood,” and steals her suitcase. A little reality there.

Boneta ( Drew Boley) and Hough are the boy and girl who fall in love. They both seem pretty nerdy. You really didn’t care whether they fell in love or broke up.

Tom Cruise (Stacee Jaxx) depicted a self-centered star who drinks, drugs, and sleeps around. I’m guessing this role wasn’t a big stretch for him. He just misses with his portrayal, but it was almost on target. His singing was surprisingly good.

Juliana Hough is adorable, and has a good sweet voice. Unfortunately, she didn’t dance much except on a pole, and she didn’t really do much on it. (She used to be on Dancing With the Stars) .

Mary J. Blige has a fantastic voice, but she had a very minor role. She also had a lot of charisma for the brief time she was on the screen.

Hough was adequate as the main character who is sweet. It was familiar. She played the exact same character in the latest version of “Footloose.”

The other Julianne Moore was good as an uptight reporter who loosens up toward the middle of the movie. Her acting was the best, but that’s not saying much.

Alec Baldwin (Dennis Dupree) and Russel Brand ( Lonny) served as the comic relief. Somehow, Alec Baldwin, wasn’t that great. I couldn’t forget he was Alec Baldwin playing a role.  There is a homosexual moment in the movie. Even that wasn’t that interesting.

Catherine Zeta Jones (Patricia Whitmore) over-acted, and her American accent sounded forced. To her credit she is beautiful, and she can sing and dance.

Some of the familiar songs were, “Hit Me With your best shot,” Harden My Heart, Can’t Fight This feeling, and “Anyway you Want it.” There were more songs, and I liked them all. They picked the biggest hits.

I do judge movies on whether or not I’d be willing to watch them again. Not this one.

I give it a C+. The plus is for the music.

Five lessons I’ve learned from people I admire


The Thinking Man sculpture at Musée Rodin in Paris

The Thinking Man sculpture at Musée Rodin in Paris (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I notice that is so much easier to complain and be negative than to be happy and positive. I don’t know why that’s really true. Is it the path of least resistance. Anyway, I’ve been thinking about people I know and admire. What qualities make me want to be around them.

1. They are not complainers. If you ask them how they are, in general they will say things like:

“I can’t complain.”

“Life is great.”

“I’m pretty happy.”

Although I complain myself , I don’t want to hear it. That is definitely something I have to work on!

2. They are good listeners, and interested in your life and feelings.

Have you ever said thought-provoking things to someone, and they act like they haven’t heard a word you said? I had a conversation with someone like that today. They just kept talking about what they were doing.

Or how about the person who is only listening long enough to tell you something about themselves. (I am guilty of that myself, and it’s something I have to work on)

3. People I admire try to open their minds to new ideas. Sometimes, as people get older, they get stuck in thinking a certain way. (Yes, me too!) Sometimes we get stuck in the decade when we were young and impressionable.

4. People who I admire are adventuresome. They’ll try new restaurants, new places to visit, and new activities.  I am one of those people who like security. There’s security in doing the same thing over and over.

5. People I admire are tolerant of other points of view. For me, that’s one of the hardest things of all. Why is that?

6. People I admire are loyal  They will get over initial hurts, and look at the big picture. They will put family and friends first. I try to do this as much as I can, but I like others, are fallible too.

What are some qualities you admire in people? What do you think is important?

I Used to be Fat: TV Review


I Used to Be Fat

I Used to Be Fat (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Sometimes, I really like to watch those weight TV shows. They seem to motivate me. I really would like to take off some pounds. Like everything else, you have to work at it.

I watched a teenage oriented show on MTV entitled I used to be Fat. The young woman on it had been fat all her life.

When we meet her parents, and family we understand why. Although I do believe some people have a tendency to put on weight, the environment plays just as big a role.

They have all the creamy bad stuff in their pantry and refrigerator. Several different types of pancake mix, creamy stuff, and generally bad. They all put it in a big sack to give to the food pantry. (I suppose it’s not okay for them, but okay for the poor.)

Anyway, this young girl has a trainer who is merciless on her. The first day she is running across the football field. When she’s done with that, she’s going up and down the stairs of the stadium. ( I think he could have just had her run back and forth across the football field on her first day.)

Her father, who is overweight himself, tried to motivate her. He obviously cares about her, and that’s a good thing. I think it’s the case of the pot calling the kettle black. I think it would really motivate her  more if he was earnestly trying to take off some of his bulk. It looks like he’s making a half hearted attempt.  Her mother seems to be out of the picture. She does take responsibility for her kids being overweight.

The trainer and father point out that losing weight is a mental exercise. She keeps saying she can’t, can’t, and can’t. Finally she starts saying, “yes, I can.” (Sound familiar).

There is one scene where she goes to a restaurant with her brother and friend. They order all that bad stuff that they serve in restaurants:  hamburgers, french fries, and fried food. They seem to enjoy taunting her with it. She orders a salad, but you know those restaurant salads, some of them are loaded with hidden calories. At least she’s trying.

Finally, she manages to run a marathon, and succeeds. She goes off to college, and after about 3 more months she’s lost 79 pounds, and looks like a different person. (She could’ve picked a more flattering outfit to show off her good points.)

Her parents at the reveal still look pretty overweight. That was a disappointment. It means she’ll go back to the same lousy food environment when she comes home.

This program reminded me that losing weight is such a mental exercise, and that negative self talk is such a defeating thing. If you can find some determination, you can change things for yourself. (Even if you’re over 60)

Even thought this show was about a teenager, I still found it full of good information. It’s things I knew, but needed to be reminded about.

 

 

From an 1855 letter


An acquaintance of mine is part Cherokee, and photocopied this letter. I asked if I could borrow it for my blog and he said, “sure.” It’s quite insightful.

Bronze statue of Chief Noah Sealth ("Chie...

Bronze statue of Chief Noah Sealth (“Chief Seattle”), Chief of the Suquamish, Five Points / Tilikum Place (where Denny Way meets Fifth Avenue, roughly the border between Belltown and South Lake Union), Seattle, Washington. Sculpted by local sculptor James Wehn, unveiled November 13, 1912. On the National Register of Historic Places, ID #84003502. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

From An 1855 letter.

We are indebted to the National Wildlife Conservation News for publishing the following thought-provoking letter written to President Franklin Pierce in 1855. It was sent to him by Chief Sealth of the Duwanish Tribe in state of Washington:

“The Great Chief in Washington sends word that he wishes to buy our land. How can you buy or sell the sky—the warmth of the land? The idea is strange to us. We do not own the freshness of the air or the sparkle of the water. How can you buy them from us? Every part of this earth is sacred to my people. Every shiny pine needle, every sandy shore, every mist in the dark woods, every clearing and humming insect is holy in the memory and experience of my people.”

“We know that the white man does not understand our ways. One portion of the land is the same to him as the next, for he is a stranger who comes in the night and takes from the land whatever he needs. The earth is not his brother, but his enemy, and his children’s birthright is forgotten.

“There is no quiet place in the white man’s cities. No place to hear the leaves of spring or the rustle of insect wings. But perhaps because I am savage and do not understand, the clatter seems to insult the ears. And what is there to life if a man cannot hear the lovely cry of the whippoorwill or the arguments of the frogs around the pond at night.

“The whites, too, shall pass—perhaps sooner than other tribes. Continue to contaminate your bed, and you will one night suffocate in your own waste. When the buffalo are all slaughtered, the wild horses all tamed,  the secret corners of the forest heavy with the scent of many men, and the views of the ripe hills blotted by talking wires. Where is the thicket? Gone. Where is the eagle? Gone. And what is to say goodbye to the swift and the hunt, the end of living, and the beginning of survival.

Do you think he was an insightful prophet?