Desiderata (Author unknown. Reputedly found among papers of Adlai Stevenson) 


Go placidly amid the noise and the haste.  And remember what peace there may be in silence. As far as possible, without surrender, be on good terms with all others, even to the dull and the ignorant; they too have their story. Avoid loud and aggressive persons; they are vexatious to the spirit. If you compare yourself with others, you may become vain or bitter, for always there will be greater and lesser person that yourself. Enjoy you achievements as well as your plans. Keep interested in your own career, however humble; it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time. Exercise caution in your business affairs, for the world is full of trickery. But let this not blind you to what virtue there is; many persons strive for high ideals, and everywhere life is full of heroism. Be yourself. Especially do not feign affection. Neither be cynical about love; for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment, it is as perennial as the grass. Take kindly the counsel of the years, gracefully surrendering the things of youth. Nurture strength of spirit I to shield you in sudden misfortune. But do not distress yourself with dark imaginings. Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness. Beyond a wholesome disciple, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe no less than the trees and the stars; you have a right to be here. And whether or not it is clear to you, no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should. Therefore be at peace with God whatever you conceive him to be. And whatever your labor  sand aspiration, in the noisy confusion of life, keep peace in your should. With all its sham, drudgery and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be cheerful. Strive to be happy.

Author unknown. Reputedly found among papers of Adlai Stevenson.

My Prayer: I did not write this. I found it in some old papers. I thought it was good advice! 


Lord, you know I am growing older.  Keep me from becoming talkative and possessed with the idea that I must express myself on every subject.  Release me from the craving to straighten out everyone’s affairs.

Keep me from the recital of endless detail. Give me strength to get to the point. Seal my lips when I am inclined to tell of my aches and pains. They are increasing, as you know, with the passing years, and the love to speak of them grows sweeter as time goes by.

Teach me the glorious lesson that occasionally I may be wrong! Make me thoughtful but not nosy; helpful but not bossy. With my vast store of wisdom and experience, you have given me, it does seem a pity not to use it all. 

But you know Lord, I want to have a few friends in this life and the next

Amen 

Voices from the Grave


Today, my husband gave me the rarest of gifts. It’s the sound of my late father’s voice.

My husband had rescued some old tapes that my mother had in her house. As we were clearing up the house in order for her to move into an apartment, he spotted the tapes. Having vague  recollections of making the tapes when I was little,  we kept them. We schlepped (dragged)  them from pillar to post for the last 30 years.  We could never find a machine to play them on -until last week.

My husband asked my collector type neighbor if he knew of a machine that would play old reel-to-reel tapes.  Now, my husband is one of those technical types. He has the magic touch with machinery.   So, he fiddled and fussed. He ran the tapes backwards and forwards. He spliced and diced them together. He did this for me.

“I think I have a tape of your nieces when they were little,” he said.

Knowing that my Dad had brought home the machine from his job as a publicity specialist in the Cleveland Police Department, I knew it was probably my “big sisters” and I. And then I heard him. My dad’s voice. He is telling us how to operate the machine. Then he is interviewing us. He uses his flowery English. I know it’s him. But it doesn’t sound like him. Maybe because he was 43 years old.

“Who is this black-haired beauty?” he says about my oldest sister. “Who is this beautiful blonde?” talking about my other sister. “And here is Barbie.” (Me.) He asks us questions. I sing the “Itsy Bitsy Spider”. I talk about going to Kindergarten. I count to 10, and say my address and phone number. We all sing songs together. I  faintly hear my mother in the background, suggesting things to ask.  Mom was always the director, and Dad liked it that way. I wish she would’ve spoken louder.

On the tape, we  all sound so happy. Our parents had a marriage to be envied. They clearly adored each other. She put on lipstick for him, and he repeatedly brought her flowers and candy. They kissed and hugged each other all the time. They rarely argued.

My father passed away short of his 65th birthday. I’ve outlived him by 2 years. My mother lived until 91, but she was never the same after he died. Such a determined person she went on with her life, but she didn’t smile or laugh nearly as much.

It’d been forty years since I’d heard his voice.

It’s a long time to be without that unconditional love. It’s probably why his voice was unrecognizable at first. Does every girl adore their father; remembering them as them most handsome and perfect Daddy in the world?

There was a little alcove on our first floor, leading into the kitchen. I would always excitedly greet my father with a huge hug when he came home from work. He worked several jobs, but it never felt like it. When he would come home late, he would always come in my room to kiss me goodnight. He would later say, “I came in your  room and you were pounding your ear. ”

So, to hear his voice again and have a recording of it is nothing short of a miracle.

I hope anyone reading this realizes that the sound of your loved one’s voice is really precious. In this world of technology, it’s so easy to do. Don’t forget. You never know where their voices may be silenced.

 

 

Columbus Arts and Music Festival Debuts September 18 


                                  

Arkadiy Gips, well known Columbus violinist, envisioned sharing Jewish music, identity, and culture with the Columbus community. 

” It’s the first Jewish music festival in Columbus. We want to showcase talented musicians who play music in Columbus. We have a lot of different heritage festivals and now we’re bringing a Jewish art and music festival to Columbus.” said Gips. 

 This vision will become a reality on September 18, 2016 at the JCC, 1125 College Avenue. The Columbus Jewish Foundation, JCC, and Jewish Family services is supporting this great arts event. 

Children’s musician, Marc Rossio, will kick off the festivities at 1:00 P.M. Children and adults will enjoy Marc’s creative songs and great showmanship. 

Arkadiy and Friends includes Cheri Papier, Lucy Smirnov, and Lucas Holmes. They have played traditional Jewish music with an original music arrangement for over twenty years. 

American Gypsy includes Arkadiy, Neil Jacobs, and Steven Fox. “American Gypsy’s debut CD was nominated for the American Independent Music Award’s, “Album of the Year”! It will be a real treat to listen to them. 

Sveltlana Portnyansky, a well-known Jewish singer and California Cantor, will sing and narrate the documentary, “Terezin,The Code to Life.” Terezin was the concentration camp in Czechoslovakia that imprisoned talented children and adults from the arts during World War II. The documentary earned second prize in the Toronto Documentary Film Festival. 

Laeli is a Jewish music project made up of husband and wife, Eli and Lael Palnik. Elijah composes original songs, and they perform contemporary and Israeli songs. 

Cantor Max Axelrod, representing the JCC book fair will be discussing his book, “Your Guide to the Jewish Holdays: From Shofar to Seder.”

Columbus area Jewish community choirs including Koleinu, Temple Israel and Temple Beth Shalom will perform. 

Free performances will take place every 45 minutes. 

The final performance, a showcase gala, takes place from 6:00 to 7:00 P.M. at the JCC Roth-Resler theater. All the musicians will collaborate and play together. It will be amazing! 

Tickets for the showcase gala concert will be $20.00 for the general public and $15.00 for JCC members and Senior citizens. 

“It’s a time to celebrate our Jewish identity together. This is a time to have fun, listen to great music, and eat wonderful food. We want this day to express the heart and soul of the entire Jewish community in Columbus,” said Gips.  

To get exact times of performances, and more information about the artists, consult the festival’s website. 

http:/www.columbusjewisharts.com

The Dulles Air and Space Museum:  the Discovery Shuttle and the Enola Gay are big exhibits


Going to an airplane museum is not something I longed to do, but since my husband is passionate about air power, I agreed to go. I am one of those people who likes to fly in airplanes, not look at them. Surprisingly, I found this museum worth my time. The museum is located in Chantilly, Virginia. (Not to be confused with the National Air and Space Museum located in DC)  Continue reading

Ghosts linger around my Passover table 


The Passover of 2016 was tinged with sadness because I couldn’t help thinking of my childhood.  My parents and grandparents faded from sight; one right after the other, mostly without warning.

Grandma was a small, stout lady, with a face that I can’t really ever forget because I look so much like her, especially in my 66th year. My grandfather, was short in stature, but high on everyone’s respect list. He had a head full of beautiful white hair.

I remember going along with my tall, handsome, adored daddy to pick them up at their apartment. My grandmother would have her coat on, and announce to my grandfather that “the machine is outside, and it was time to go.” Why she didn’t just refer to it as the car was a mystery to me. I do remember she wore red old-fashioned shoes, a longish skirt, and a long sleeve blouse. She always carried a  black purse that held Dentyne gum. She would offer this special treat randomly to all her grandchildren.

We’d arrive at my house where we ate the standard dinner we always ate at holidays, it didn’t really matter which one. Mom was in charge and she didn’t appreciate any help.

There was always chopped liver and matzah ball soup, my mother’s tie to her ethnic background. We’d all gathered around  the kitchen table, my grandparents sitting next to each other on one side, my mother, wearing her blue apron, always up during the meal serving us.  My father and

My dapper grandpa, Harry Zelivyansky

My dapper grandpa, Harry Zelivyansky

My Grandmother, Miriam Zelivyansky when she was young.

My Grandmother, Miriam Zelivyansky when she was young.

Marilyn, Mom, Dad and me .

Marilyn, Mom, Dad and me .

My sister Marilyn and I with my dad outside of Grandma and Grandpa's house,

My sister Marilyn and I with my dad outside of Grandma and Grandpa’s house,

L to R: Eileen, Dad holding me, and Marilyn.

L to R: Eileen, Dad holding me, and Marilyn.

two sisters and I would take our familiar seats. It was usually turkey, sometimes a roast, salad, sweet potatoes, and a vegetable.

The Seder I remember was not too formal. I do remember my grandfather singing some prayers. He had a beautiful voice that I can almost hear when I close my eyes and concentrate.

Little did I know that one day my grandparents and parents would be long gone, but their presence would always linger; they’re always around me, like a loving purple aura.

This year I particularly missed them all, but I’m grateful for the love that is still there.

 

Singing my blues away!


My Life in my 60's

Singing is a great thing to do if you enjoy it! There’s no age limit on this activity. It always brings me up when I’m feeling down.

I  did some singing when I was younger, but didn’t take it up again until I was 42. I joined a group called Koleinu. It’s a Hebrew word that has to do with sharing music together. One of the things we have in common is our Jewish heritage.

I look around  the group and there are some of the same members. We’ve all evolved and changed, but we’re basically the same people we were twenty years ago. Okay, twenty years has to make a little difference. (Unless you get some work done!)

Some people were new to the group this season, and felt welcomed right away.

We’ve sung all over Columbus:  a Crew’s game, The Ohio State Fair,  nursing homes, festivals, and even…

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