Get Read for the 2012 Columbus Jewish Film Festival


Columbus Jewish Film Festival

If you’re a movie buff, don’t miss the Columbus Jewish Film Festival.  If you’ve never attended this event, you’re missing out on something unmatched in Columbus. It will run from November 4-18. This year two additional days and two films were added to the usual lineup.

Recently, I met with Emily Schuss, Festival Chairperson, and Co-Chairs Linda Katz and Carole Genshaft. (Co-Chair June Frankel was not available.) They talked about the lineup of movies, special events and new programs. The films come from all over the world including: Israel, Germany, Austria, Canada, France and the U.S.

A matinee with two films has been added on Wednesday, November 14. There will be two short subjects, and a movie treat will be included. This would be ideal for seniors or anyone who has their afternoons free.

The film festival doesn’t only bring films to Columbus. After the showing of three films, there will be a Q&A session with either a director, producer, or subject/actor.

Columbus Co-chair Linda Katz said, “Our films are all so wonderful this year, that it’s hard to pick a favorite, but I have. It’s our opening night feature titled ‘My Best Enemy,’ and it’s filled with suspense, comedy, drama, and more.”

“There will be an elegant, champagne dessert reception afterwards at Columbus Museum of Art,” added Genshaft.

All three women are excited about Doc Sunday. If you’ve attended the film festival before, you know this is a day of nothing but documentaries.

One documentary is called “Silent Sunday.” It focuses on the reporter, Phil Jacobs, who uncovered a provocative story about an Orthodox rabbi. “He is one of the people we’re bringing in for a Q and A,” said Schuss.

Barrel Night will be one of the delicious events tied in with the French film, “The Day I Saw your Heart.” People will first have dinner at Barrel 44 on Main Street, and then go on to see the movie at the Drexel Theater.

Closing night will leave you with a good impression, so you’re sure to come back next year. Two outstanding movies, and an Israeli dinner will be featured.

“David” is about a lonely Muslim boy living in New York, who befriends some Yeshiva students. The director, Joel Fendelman, will answer questions after the movie

The final movie,  “Hava Nagila,” (The Movie) will answer many questions about this famous song.  It will travel all over the world and features some performances of the song.  “This movie is a great way to close on an upbeat note,” said Genshaft.

A reel pass at $110  will get you 12 films, two receptions, and a dinner. General admission is $10;  $8  for a senior, student, or JCC member.

For more detailed information about the movies, events, and celebrations, go to  http://www.cjfilmfest.org.

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A little humor about being 60+: Wishing I was a Khardashian


Image representing Meetup as depicted in Crunc...

Image via CrunchBase

September 14, 2012
I
s there a country where it’s cool to be older. If there is, I think I would like to move there. The only thing getting older gets you in Columbus, Ohio, is 10% off Tim Hortons and White Castle.  I have to admit .90 is better than $1.10 for coffee. What’s even more insulting is that I don’t even have to show them my “Golden Buckeye” card. They literally take me at face value.

I met with a Meetup Group called “Senior Women”. It was not a happy experience. First of all, they looked older than me, and were trying to find exciting things to do together. They thought going to an outlet mall together would be a rip-roaring time. They glared at me when I told them I still had a husband. “What do you want one of those for?” asked one woman.

Another one said, “You talk really loud.” Then she kept pointing out I wasn’t smiling. Would she be smiling if someone was insulting her. I chalk it up to some kind of disorder. I think it’s called being rude.  They all were older than me, but not by much. Yikes!

Believe it or not, I watched the Khardashian reality show today,  and actually felt jealous of the head mama. Not only does she keep her kids around her, but she’s made them all millionaires. And what do they do? Nothing much. They stand around and look great, take expensive vacations, and constantly eat fancy food. They also look good in their clothes. Wouldn’t that be a great life? Maybe that’s why their show about absolutely nothing is popular.  I am not completely ignorant.  I know they have to come up with scripts about doing nothing every week.

Me? My wardrobe consists of workout clothes, and not much else. The last classy vacation I took was to Myrtle Beach. I was happy to take it too. Even though it was August, and during the biggest drought in the summer. There was a drunk couple in the pool who were loudly throwing each other around in the pool. It wasn’t like Tahiti or wherever the rich people go these days.

And I am getting older. Like it or not. And this society does not celebrate bags and wrinkles, but things could be a lot worse.

I guess I better try looking at the bright side of life.

I have a nice husband, and great children. I own a computer, and have a blog where I can write my deepest darkest secrets.  I have a house to live in, and great friends. And I can save 10% at Tim Hortons, and White Castle.

So I’m not rich and famous. I would probably hate the paparazzi anyway. Look at Princess Kate. The poor girl can’t even bathe topless on her terrace without somebody taking her picture with a camera that can see miles away.

At least I don’t have to worry about that! Life is good!

Favoritism, Talent and Leadership!: Do they go hand-in-hand?


 

leadership

leadership (Photo credit: Ed Gaillard)

 
Is showing favoritism a part of being human? Is it inevitable? Do people do that because it’s the natural order of things? Do you need to show favoritism to get things accomplished? Is it fanciful to think there should be more equality?

Maybe the reasons socialism and communism didn’t work is because somebody always has to be on top. That means somebody always has to be at the bottom.

Whenever you belong to a group, the outstanding people always rise to the top. No matter what kind of group it is. It can be in school, work, or for fun.

What was your experience with kids sports?
I remember when my children played amateur sports some coaches would never give some of the kids a chance to play. All they wanted was the win, so they would only allow the talented kids to play.

There were some outstanding coaches who realized every kid should have a chance, so they would give everyone an opportunity to play. Some of the disgruntled parents of the “Stars” would have a fit because they wanted their kids to always be featured.

 

I’m sure the Olympic heroes who will be celebrated this week were all the “stars” that were played. Do you think any of them rose from the bottom?

 

English: The Olympic Flag flying in Victoria, ...

English: The Olympic Flag flying in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, outside the provincial legislature of British Columbia, in recognition of Vancouver’s hosting of the 2010 Winter Olympic Games (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

School leaders
Once when I was teaching school, I allowed some of the students who were never leaders become leaders during a school activity. They were thrilled to be given this opportunity.

Guess what happened?

The natural leaders, who would’ve been assigned in the first place took the leadership positions anyway.

Sometimes, I feel that people who are overlooked should get a chance anyway. Have you ever been in a group where equality really goes on?

Have you ever seen where a shy person given a chance, develops into a leader.

Do you think there is a better way?

What do you think?