10 things volunteering can do for others and you!


1. There’s nothing like giving to others. It makes you feel warm and fuzzy inside.
2. People do need people. Although some animals need help too.
3. Meet other people you wouldn’t ordinarily ever come in contact with.
4. Share your knowledge about something: for example, art, writing, music…
5. Helping older people is a good thing. Some of them are very isolated, and this is not a good way to live. There are many children who need someone too!
6. Put good karma in the universe. ( I’m not sure there is such a thing, but
who knows?)
7. You would be surprised how many people you help will want to pay it forward and help someone else.
8. Maybe learn a new skill while you’re volunteering.
9. Stretch yourself further than you thought was possible.
10. In the process, you will make some good friends.

What have you gotten out of volunteering? Share your experiences and thoughts.

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A biography by Barbara A. Topolosky


Ruth Stone’s Biography
by Barbara Topolosky
Ruth Stone's Biography

I decided that writing biographies might be a good thing to do for people.

Haven’t you always wanted to know details about your relative’s life. Here’s a chance for you to get those details.

I can scan photos, make a CD of this, or write a book.

If you’re interested contact me at Btopolo5@me.com

Why is the president of “The Ohio State University” so thoughtless?


I live in Columbus, Ohio. I did get here by attending “The Ohio State University.” When you live in Columbus, Ohio, you better get used to hearing about The Ohio State Buckeyes. When they win, everyone is in a fantastic mood, and when they lose we are all sad. To see who won

Picture of Gordon Gee, president of Ohio State...

Picture of Gordon Gee, president of Ohio State University (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

the game, you don’t have to check the scoreboard, just look at everyone’s expressions. When you’re traveling you know you’re heading toward home when people on the plane are wearing Buckeye scarlet and gray garb. I am just as bad as everyone else.

 

The president of the university, Gordon Gee, has to be a bright man. He actually went to “Brown”, his old Alma Mater to become their president for a while. He must do his job well because they’re paying him millions of dollars to oversee “The Ohio State University.” How many people can make millions of dollars in a year?

His fashion sense isn’t great. He wears a bow tie constantly. That must say something about him. Is he a nonconformist, too lazy to tie a tie, or does he just want attention?

 

He does have a nasty habit of sticking his foot down his mouth. In December, he said something inappropriate about Catholics. This was directed against the Notre Dame football team. “The fathers are holy on Sunday, and they’re holy hell the rest of the week. You just can’t trust those damn Catholics on a Thursday or a Friday.”

 

This is supposed to be funny? I don’t find it the least bit amusing. The board is treating his like he’s 12, and requiring him to apologize. I don’t know who he’s going to apologize to? The Pope? They’re also making him attend some kind of class or lecture on how to be more tactful.

 

Maybe they should teach him about life in the 21st century. Maybe someone should inform him that bullying and making fun of groups of people is not socially appropriate. Maybe in 1945 that would go over, but not it 2013? What kind of role modeling is this behavior. Isn’t he a leader of a lot of students? It sounds a lot like something a bully might say!

This isn’t the first inappropriate thing he has said.

 

But he’ll stick around, and probably make another mistake in a few months.

 

The big shots in life just can get away with all kinds of things.

 

What do you think?

 

Where do you think ghosts and spirits hang out? I want your ghost stories!


Life is strange. The older you get, the more you are reminded that our time on earth is temporary. It doesn’t matter how important or unimportant you are.  Someday, you’re going to have to say goodbye.

The last uncle I have passed away. He went in the middle of a meal surrounded by friends and family. He was 97. The man was as healthy as a horse; unfortunately, his mind wasn’t exactly working right. He wasn’t aware of it and still enjoyed life. At least he happily died, surrounded by friends and family. I think that would be the perfect way to go.

I attended his funeral. It wasn’t too sad because 97 is stretching it. The trouble is I’m in my 60’s, so going to funerals makes me realize my time on earth is limited.  Most of my friends are still above ground with me, but I have lost a few.

After the funeral,  the family went all over the cemetery visiting dead relatives. I am not sure about this. I guess if you want to remember them, it’s a good thing to do.  I don’t know if there are spirits there or not. I’m pretty skeptical, but it wouldn’t surprise me all that much. I’m thinking if you’re a spirit you’d probably want to hang out at more interesting places. A cemetery is a little too quiet for me.

I like the idea of surviving in one way or the other after you physically die.  I mean who wants it all to come to an end? Unfortunately, none of my deceased relatives have visited me. I think the coolest thing would be get a light or sign. I’ve known people who said that really happened to them. People who are logical, intelligent and not the type to make things up.

My Great Aunt

When I was little, a Great-Aunt would visit from California,  and my dad would take her to a cemetery to visit her “friends.” I used  to tag along. My father would say, “she has more friends in the cemetery than she does in other places.” I liked looking at the headstones. There was a picture of a little boy on one of the headstones and he was holding a drum. I could count on paying a visit to the “Little Drummer Boy” when Auntie made her annual visit to Ohio.

So, when I go to the cemetery it doesn’t really bother me. What does bother me it that almost all the older relatives I used to visit in their homes are under the ground; it’s pretty surreal. It makes me realize I’m fast approaching the age my “old Auntie” was when we accompanied her on her yearly pilmigrage,

I just can’t get much satisfaction over looking at the headstone of a favorite relative. They just aren’t going to answer back when I talk to them.  I do it anyway because you never know. They just might be listening.

English: Old Jewish Headstone, Hull, East Ridi...

English: Old Jewish Headstone, Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire, England. These old Jewish headstones with Hebrew inscriptions are in the disused Hessle Road cemetery TA0828 : Hessle Road Jewish Cemetery. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

What do you think? Any good ghost stories?

Is is smart to post on Facebook? Colleen Marshall investigates and I am her guinea pig


Colleen Marshall and me

Colleen Marshall and me

I call myself the Facebook Queen. That is because I am on it way too much. I started out on Facebook because I wanted to keep track of my adult children. However , I quickly learned my adult children are smart enough to know it is not the best idea to post anything that can have any possible significance on Facebook. In other words, don’t let  your dirty laundry out on Facebook. So, I wasn’t going to find much out about them by looking at their Facebook pages. I have to use an ancient device, the telephone, to communicate with them.

Positive side of Facebook

I ended up finding people I knew in elementary school, junior High, high school and college. Some of the people were never really my friends, more like people I said hello to in the hall. But I did find two of my high school closest friends that I lost track of.   I even found my speech teacher. I even borrowed some of my kid’s friends who were happy to let me see their posts.

I’m in the Harmony Project, a huge volunteer choir,  and can keep up with some of the members using Facebook. It’s a good way to keep up with what’s going on around town. I can remember people’s birthdays now because they are posted on my Facebook page.

I also can keep up with relatives I haven’t seen in years and see pictures of their children and grandchildren.
Some of the people I’ve found are people who I admire, and wouldn’t have a chance to talk to in real life.  For example, author Alice Hoffman has a page and I was able to interview her online for an article I was writing for a local newspaper. That would have been unheard of years ago. In that sense, social media is a terrific thing.

Facebook is the place where I’ve found out that people are getting married, having birthdays, and passed away. It’s like the new town crier. Much faster than snail mail, a telephone, or the slower newspaper.

I also want people to read my blog since I think I am so brilliant. It’s another way of being heard. One of the places I advertise it is on Facebook.

Facebook has a negative side
In Ohio, employers can ask you for your Password, so they can check you out. Is this fair?

Colleen Marshall, my Facebook friend, was looking for someone to demonstrate that people can access your account if they have your password. She was looking for a guinea pig who would not only divulge her  password, but allow her to look at everything she’s ever put on Facebook.

Other people were too smart to do this. On the other hand,  I didn’t think there was anything on there that would embarrass me.  I did get to meet her, something that probably wouldn’t have ever happened in real life.

See how I react when she shows me what she found. It will be on( WCMH Channel 4) tomorrow night February 19, at 6:00 P.M. Tune in.

It will bring you the message that you shouldn’t put on Facebook anything that you wouldn’t want anyone to know!

What do you think of Facebook? Do you think it’s a time waster or valuable? Would you give it up?

A little bit of heaven on the edge of The Hocking Hills


A cabin in the woods.

A cabin in the woods.

We own a little piece of property near the Hocking Hills in Ohio.  My husband’s family bought it long before I married him. It used to have a cabin, but it’s been taken down. Now, all we’re left with is its natural beauty and the same creek that’s been running through it for eons.

I remember wading in the creek in my 20’s,  but I wouldn’t do it now. I can’t put up with all the rocks on the bottom, and I’m not quite as daring as I used to be.

My husband comes alive when he gets on that property. He’ll go through all the brush  and tall grass off the path. I followed him into it the other day, and fell over some fallen branches. (I thought, what am I doing, I’m too old for this.)   Maybe my days of going through the untamed wilderness are through. I’ll just stay on the path. I think when my husband is 85, he’ll still find a way to plod through the brush and climb those paths.

After a freak storm swept through Ohio, a lot of trees fell all over the place.  The family had to hire a logger to clear out and cut down  damaged trees. Just like people, sometimes the old ones have to go to make room for the new ones.

I was afraid cutting down those trees would ruin the property, but nature has a way of coming back every year. It did look a little sparse at first, but now it’s  been replenished, and you can see a little further than before.

Last year, I was fascinated when I walked down to the creek and there were hundreds of colorful butterflies swirling all around.  It was enchanting to see them in such a natural environment.
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My husband is happiest when he is building something and working with his hands. He loves to take his garden tractor down to those hills and clear the brush. I jokingly  call him Daniel Boone. Sometimes I think he was born in the wrong century.

I like the sounds of the property. All you hear is the rustling of the leaves. It’s mostly silent. If you sit by the creek, you can hear the sounds of the water. It can be quite peaceful.

My husband is always pointing out to me where a deer probably slept. In all these years, I’ve only seen one.

Milestones

We celebrated a lot of milestones down there.  Our engagement, marriage,  our children, new decisions, jobs and heart breaks. If we’re restless,  we will hop into the car  and take a little ride to the woods.  It used to be five of us but the kids all grew up, so now it’s back to just  the two of us.

I used to bound up and down the pathways.  Now, I walk and have to stop several times before I get to the top.  I recently figured out a good old walking stick made up of a fallen limb of a tree makes the climb easier. I do wonder how much longer I’m going to be able to keep walking the several pathways my husband has carved out with his little tractor.

What is more breathtaking than trees, and a vista to look out at them?  All the wild flowers of purple, yellow, and the wispy pussy willows? In the winter it’s a little more desolate.  I know that in the spring yellow daffodils will be waiting for me. I’m grateful to the former owners of the property who planted them years ago.

Rushville in the fall.

Rushville in the fall.

Since I’ve gotten older I’ve realized material objects aren’t going to bring me joy, but I can feel happy in the quiet woods. It also helps to have my Daniel Boone by my side.