Feeling my age: I related to AARP Magazine


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I’ve been getting AARP magazine free of charge since I’ve been 50. I’m now 62. I finally opened it up and started reading it.

I found it interesting. I could relate to every single article. Now, that is frightening. However,  I don’t think I’m ready for the 24 hour alarm thing that you wear around your neck in case you fall over and can’t get up.

I think people would still say I died young if I dropped over tomorrow. So, there is still some quality life left to live.

Does that mean I’m officially a senior citizen? I guess I’ve been one for a while, but just didn’t want to admit it to myself.

In this society, it is not cool to be older. And that’s too bad.  At least I’m not alone. There’s a lot of baby boomers, so why haven’t we managed to make it a popular thing? Maybe, because none of us wants to admit they’re old.

When did I first realize people looked at me differently?

I’m trying to remember the first time I had an inkling I wasn’t a 20, 30, or 40 something. I think it was when I was substitute teaching. The kids started asking me how old I was, and when I told them they looked shocked. Some comments included “when are you going to retire?”

I noticed the teachers in the teacher’s lounge looked like they were  my kid’s ages.  (That’s because they were.)

Maybe it was when the parking attendant called me “ma’am” for the first time. When I chastised him, he said, “ma’am my mother taught me to be polite to my elders.

Maybe it was when my kids started asking me to get my hearing checked. The times they started giving me unsolicited advice. (I don’t mind, they’re pretty wise for their ages).

I knew I was in trouble when I was in line for a job, and one of the other people applying offered me a seat. She said something like, “I’m so sorry, I should’ve offered this to you 10 minutes ago.  That was at least 10 or 15 years ago. Time gets blurry, the older you get.

When I was 40, I appeared on a call- in radio show for an hour.  The DJ made me an hour-long guest because he thought I was funny to be bemoaning the fact that I was turning 40.  Now I completely get it.

So, now what?
I’m thinking I should go on an adventure trip while I can still walk fast.  I heard the senior hostel trips are fun.

Maybe it’s time to admit, I’m older, and I’m lucky I haven’t bitten the dust. I’m in pretty good health, so I better start living it up. I actually feel as good as I ever did. (Maybe the secret is going to the gym, swimming aerobics, and walking! )

But, I still can’t walk into a senior citizens center. Not yet.

Any advice for having a rip-roaring time after 60? Any good adventure trips?

10 top reasons a Baby Boomer still misses her mother


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My mother died 5 years ago. She died a day before Mother’s Day. (It wasn’t this exact date, but close enough). I still miss her all the time. I miss her when I have some good news to tell her. I miss her when I just want to talk. How many of us will dial the phone number after someone we loved has died just to hear it ring? I don’t do it any more, but I did for a little while after she died.

Here are my top 10 reasons for missing her.

  • 1. She loved me unconditionally, and I loved her back.
  •  2. She was a good listener.
  • 3. she was a link to my past although she started to forget it at the end. She called me by my childhood nickname.  I miss hearing her say it.
  • 4. She appreciated any little thing I did for her, no matter how trivial.
  • 5. She still tried to mother me any chance she got. One time the apartment she lived in sent up some extra food for her, and she asked me if I wanted it. (It was sweet).
  • 6. She was always happy and excited to see me.
  • 7. She was someone I could be around without watching everything I said.
  •  8. We had fun together. We loved to go to restaurants together. By the end of her life, that’s about all she could still do.
  •  9. She cared about my kids and husband and  always treated them like royalty.
  •  10. It still kept my father alive in some way. She never forgot stories about him. My only hope is that they’re together somewhere in some way.

Happy Mother’s Day Mom wherever you are!

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My First Experience at a Women Writer’s Retreat


You’re never too old to learn new things. I put this on my Facebook page, and it’s something I live by. Just because you’re older, don’t give up on educating yourself.

I just attended Deanna Adam’s, ” Sixth Annual Women Writers Winter Retreat”. It was in Willoughby, Ohio, a perfect setting. Women of all ages and ability levels attended this retreat (You didn’t  have to be Anne Tyler  or  Alice Hoffman to qualify for this retreat.) Women stayed in a bed and breakfast, and a charming hotel.

Imagine spending three days with  17 women whose commonality is a love of writing! How about listening to successful authors who have already made it in the writing world.  Speakers included: Joyce Dyer, Sandra Gurvis, and Julianne Lindsay. They represented different venues of writing, and they all were happy to share their knowledge.

With the advent of self-publishing and e-books people who have a story to say, can write it, and easily get it published. It’s a wide-open market. “If your story isn’t well-written and interesting  it probably won’t succeed,” said author Sandra Gurvis.

Spending three days discussing and learning was great. Not to mention breaking bread with everyone.

If you have a passion, investigate it. See if there is anyone else who shares your passions. Groups are forming all over the internet. In some cases, there are chances to meet in person.

Like anything else, you have to make an effort! Go for it.

Women bonding at Deanna Adams Sixth Annual Winter Retreat!

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